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Fourteen Questions College Coaches Hate Getting from Recruits

Families should also steer clear from asking questions that they could just as easily research themselves. Coaches want to recruit athletes who are interested in and knowledgeable about their program.

The recruiting process is a lot like trying to sell a product. Think about it: Recruits have to be educated about their audience (the college coaches) and know what those coaches are looking for in a recruit.

Then, they have to show the coaches why they would be a great fit. Recruits need to build relationships with these coaches and keep the coaches interested in what they have to offer.

A great way to make a coach less interested in a recruit? Asking the wrong questions. We talked to five former college coaches to determine the questions that they do not want to get from recruits in their initial communications.

  • “Coach, can you give me a scholarship?”

  • “How many scholarships does the school give you?”

  • “Are you going to offer me?”

  • “Well, you can pull some strings at admissions to get him more scholarship dollars, right?”

  • “Am I qualified for merit monies?”

  • Using “Scholarships Wanted” in an email subject line

  • “Do you have my major?”

  • “How’d the team do last fall?”

  • “Are you a Nike or adidas school?”

  • “Who do you play?”

  • “Who’s in your conference?”

  • “Coach, I’m playing at [insert showcase or tournament]. Can you come see me play?”

  • “Can you call me back at [insert phone number]?”

  • “What do you look for in a player?”

Overall, the coaches clearly stated that recruits should avoid any questions related to scholarships or financial aid in their initial communications with a coach. One of the coaches recommended awaiting until after the coach has watched them compete and the coach has indicated they are interested in the recruit.

Families should also steer clear from asking questions that they could just as easily research themselves. Coaches want to recruit athletes who are interested in and knowledgeable about their program.

Finally, recruits need to stay away from asking for favors, or asking the coach to do something for them. Especially at the beginning, the recruit should be driving the process, not the other way around.  

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